Tag Archives: This Week in Financial History

This Week in Financial History

This Week in Financial History

For the Week of April 6, 2015

April 6

1851 – The Canadian postal service is transferred from British control and sets a uniform postal rate of 3 pence a letter.

April 9

1987 – The Supreme Court of Canada rules that the right to strike is not guaranteed by the constitution.

1869 – In England, Hudson Bay Company shareholders accept the terms of Rupert’s Land Act of 1868 and the company cedes its territory to Canada.

April 10

1990 – The House of Commons passes the Goods and Services Tax bill by a vote of 144 to … Continue reading

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This Week in Financial History

This Week in Financial History

For the week of March 30

March  30

1872 – The first issue of The Mail is published; it later becomes part of The Globe and Mail.

 

 

 

 

 

March 31

1937 – The Toronto Stock Exchange closes at 193.6, up 200% since 1932.

1831 – Montreal is incorporated as a city.

April 1

1976 – The federal government raises the federal minimum wage to $2.90 per hour.

April 2

1968 – Montreal Mayor Jean Drapeau creates Canada’s first modern lottery to help pay down the $250 million deficit from Expo ’67.

 

 

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This Week in Financial History

This Week in Financial History

For the week of March 16:

March 16

1967 – Quebec raises its provincial sales taxes from 6% to 8% to supplement family allowances. This becomes the highest sales tax in Canada.

1977 – Quebec Finance Minister Jacques Parizeau abolishes the province’s Anti-Inflation Board.

1990 – Prime Minister Brian Mulroney signs 10 bilateral agreements with Mexico and discusses free trade with President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.

March 17

1577 – Martin Frobisher gets a commission from the Cathay Company to hunt for gold in the Arctic. He later returns with tons of worthless pyrites, which are dumped as … Continue reading

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This Week in Financial History: For the week of March 9

This Week in Financial History: For the week of March 9

March 9

1824 – Canada formally adopts the patent system.

1855 – First Great Western Railway locomotive crosses the 255-metre Niagara Falls suspension bridge to the U.S., giving Ontario direct rail connection to the state of New York.  This is the world’s first wire cable suspension bridge; it was built across the Gorge from 1851-55 by engineer John Roebling, who later built the Brooklyn Bridge.

1951 – The House of Commons approves incorporation of TransCanada Pipelines to build 5,000 km natural gas pipeline from Alberta to Quebec.

March 10

1865 – In Quebec City, … Continue reading

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This Week in Financial History

This Week in Financial History

For the week of March 2:

March 2

1943 – The federal budget introduces the first “pay-as-you-earn” income tax system in Canada.

March 3

1655 – A Montreal physician offers the first medical insurance in Canada.

1919 – The first international airmail in Canada is delivered in a flight from Vancouver to Seattle, Washington.

 

 

 

 

 

1982 – Statistics Canada confirms that Canada entered a recession this year.

March 4

1933 – The Toronto Stock Exchange stays open as U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt closes all U.S. banks and stock exchanges. His embargo on … Continue reading

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This Week in Financial History

This Week in Financial History

For the week of February 23, 2015:

February 23

1855 – Parliament grants a £900,000 loan guarantee to Grand Trunk Railroad and, as a result, flushes the Canadian economy with cash.

1995 – Less than four years after it broke the 3000-mark, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closes above 4000 for the first time, finishing the day at 4003.33. The Wall Street Journal declares the next day: “Stocks Cross 4000 for the First Time, But the Visit There May Be Brief,” and warns that a correction is now “inevitable”.

February 24

1869 – The Morrill Tariff Act, which raised … Continue reading

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